10 Tips for Raising Good Humans: Life Lessons from a Global CEO with Kim Hanson

In this episode of the Brainy Moms parenting podcast, Dr. Amy Moore and Teri Miller interview Kim Hanson, the CEO of LearningRx and BrainRx –the largest network of cognitive training centers in the world. Kim shares 10 tips for moms, all focused on raising our kids as good humans. These tips are based on life lessons she learned from her parents, her work in brain training, and her experience as a mom of 4–including a set of twins and a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Kim went from teaching in an inner city school to running a global corporation all while juggling being a mom. Her tips for moms are doable, relatable, and 100% realistic. Want a sneak peak of just a few? She talks about being willing and brave, forgiving easily, being interesting instead of perfect, and being faithful in the little things. An inspiring episode for moms (and dads) with kids of all ages! 

Read the transcript and show notes for this episode:

Brainy Moms Podcast Episode 114
10 Tips for Raising Good Humans: Life Lessons from a Global CEO
with guest Kim Hanson

Dr. Amy Moore:

Hi, and welcome to this episode of Brainy Moms. I’m Dr. Amy Moore, here with my co-host Teri Miller, and we are coming to you today from a sunny and scorching hot Colorado. We’re really excited to introduce our guest today, Kim Hanson. Kim is the CEO of LearningRx (& BrainRx), the largest one-on-one brain training company in the world.

She’s a former teacher and co-author of the book UNLOCK THE EINSTEIN INSIDE: Applying New Brain Science to Wake Up the Smart in Your Child. Kim’s career passion is to help professionals, educators and parents learn more about cognitive skills training and the dramatic results it can have on real life performance. Kim is here to share some powerful life lessons for both parents and kids.

Teri Miller:

Glad you’re with us, yes. Glad you’re here, Kim.

Kim Hanson:

I’m excited to be here.

Teri Miller:

Good, yeah.

Kim Hanson:

I love your podcast. I listen to it every week.

Teri Miller:

Thank you.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Well, thank you for sponsoring our podcast!

Teri Miller:

I want to jump right in and ask a question our listeners will be curious about, how did you go from being a teacher in an inner city school to running a global cognitive training corporation?

Kim Hanson:

You know what, in some ways it’s not that big of a jump, because I think when you are teaching in the inner city, you have to know how to run a classroom, you have to know how to manage your time, there’s a lot to it. There’s a lot of decisions that you make and so I think that it was actually great practice for running a company.

Teri Miller:

Just eased right into it.

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, I think also because I had been in business or learned about business most of my life that, I don’t know, it’s definitely a challenge, I’m not going to say that, but I like to step up to challenges and so when there’s a new challenge for me to step up to, it excites me and I see it as, I don’t know, invigorating and I love to solve problems and so when I was in the inner city teaching, I was always solving problems and that’s the same thing I do at LearningRx every day, is we solve problems and figure out how to reach more people with what we do.

Dr. Amy Moore:

LearningRx actually started as your dad’s company, right?

Kim Hanson:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. Amy Moore:

You grew up in his work. You want to talk a little bit about that?

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, sure. My dad is the founder of LearningRx and when I was even just like a baby, my dad was so interested in how people learn and so he just had this curiosity for what it takes to learn and he had one question that he really wanted to answer and that was how could you have a person that is smart but had trouble learning to read? He was just very puzzled by that.

Back in the ’70s, he sought out to try to figure out what it took and that’s how he found cognitive skills in everything that we do. I hate to say I’m a guinea pig, but I was his guinea pig. As a kid, he tried to teach me how to crawl faster by putting me on an inclined board. He carpeted it so that was nice, but my mom came and saved me. He taught me how to read when I was two, I would sit in my high chair and I knew 800 flashcards of words.

Teri Miller:

That’s amazing.

Dr. Amy Moore:

It is.

Kim Hanson:

I’ve been taking IQ tests since I was four-

Teri Miller:

Wow.

Kim Hanson:

Many of them every year.

Dr. Amy Moore:

You really were a guinea pig.

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, I do really good on them but I don’t know that it’s really fair because it’s something I’ve practiced all my life.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Speaking of your dad, we’re really excited to hear some of the life lessons that he and your mom taught you, and so you told us one lesson that has stuck with you is to DO THINGS SMART. Talk about that.

Kim Hanson:

My dad was a great model to always be learning. I think because he was always studying how we learn, he knew that learning was important and so he always… No matter what he was doing… At one time he decided to do real estate and he bought, I don’t know, I think like 100 houses or apartment units back in my hometown. I would go to seminars with him.

Kim Hanson:

He was always reading books, listening to books on tape, going to seminars and that’s just what I always did right along with him because I was his partner but then also just to think about how to do things smart so for example, when I was doing my chores, I still to this day, if I vacuum my house, I can hear my dad in the back of my head saying, “Did you sweep the corners first?” If I don’t do it I’m like, “Okay, I’ll go get the broom and do it smart like my dad taught me.”

But I’m always reflecting back on what I’ve done or how could I do it better? How could I do it faster? How could I do it easier? I know when I was a kid I used to help my dad with his mailing, he would do direct mail and I would set up my sisters in the dining room table and we would set up a little conveyor belt and I would make sure everything was in the right order, and then we would try to figure out how to do it better and faster each time, so if we had a sponge then we could just put it across the envelope really quick and then pass it on.

Then if we did it this way, then the zip codes would be faster. I think that that’s just always something that my dad just instilled in me and so after I do something, I’m very reflective and I just think, even at conversation, you know what I mean? What should I have left out and what could I have said better? Or how could I have communicated it better or been more tactful? Or things like that and so, I don’t know.

One of the things he taught me too, is to pretend that you are the expert on it so if you’re even doing something mundane like doing the dishes, it’s like, okay, if I was going to teach a seminar on how to do the dishes or how to load the dishwasher, what is the best way? And so for example, I always start from the back and then move to the front, I, you know what I mean? Try to play Tetris as I’m doing it.

I have different sections, but different things go in. I put all of… When you take your silverware, you sort them anyway, so why not put all of the forks in one, all of the spoons in one, all of the knives in one and then when you go to empty it, it’s just one drop instead of having to sort everything, so just things like that.

Dr. Amy Moore:

It actually forces you almost to have a mindset of excellence like, “I’m going to do everything with excellence.” Even the little things.

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, well and then also just to also ask for feedback. A lot of people, we know that we should listen to feedback but a lot of us don’t even think to ask for feedback, so like, “What could I have done better? How could I have done this faster?”

Teri Miller:

That’s good. I want to just ask real quick for the listeners to hear, so the way you’re describing it, I’m thinking, that sounds very oldest child. Okay, so describe the family you grew up in, where are you in the mix?

Kim Hanson:

I am an oldest child, you are correct. I’m the oldest of five. I had to babysit when I was really young and, you know what I mean? My dad would always give me something to figure out and say, “You’re smart, figure it out.”

Teri Miller:

Great, okay. Just describe, so when you were 18, what were the ages and genders of your siblings?

Kim Hanson:

When I was 18, I had two sisters under me, so we’re all two years apart, my sisters and I. If I was 18, my sister Candy would have been 16 and then my sister Tonya, 14. Then I have two brothers at the end and so I’m 10 years older than my brother, Sean and 13 years older than my brother, Brett.

Teri Miller:

Definitely that successful go-getter oldest kid mentality. That’s awesome. Another lesson that you talked about is EVEN WHEN YOU’RE NOT READY, BE WILLING AND BRAVE, tell us about that one.

Kim Hanson:

My dad would give me, I should say opportunities all the time, that most kids would be like, “What? I’m just a kid, I can’t do that.” For example, at one point he was selling books for successful living and he would set up a booth and he would sell the books. Well, my dad would go off and listen to speakers and that kind of thing, and I ran the whole booth but I was probably only like nine.

Teri Miller:

That’s awesome.

Kim Hanson:

I was taking people’s checks and their money and things like that. My dad also would make me negotiate when I was little and so he might, this is an example, maybe we would go to the movies and at the mall like Sabbaros was just about to close and my dad would give me $5 and he’d say, “Go see how much pizza you can get for $5.” I’d have to. I’m like, “Dad.” But it really… I had to negotiate all the time, you know what I mean? Go up, introduce myself, be friendly and then Hey, I bet you’re going to throw away a lot of this pizza, how about I take some of it off your hands-

Teri Miller:

Good.

Kim Hanson:

… for $5?

Dr. Amy Moore:

Did it work?

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, in fact every time it was successful, I would have to do more of it. But that helps me today when I’m working with a vendor or that type of thing, I try to negotiate the best deal for our company and for our franchisees, and so it comes in handy.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Well, and that can be scary. That’s what you’re saying, you learned bravery from the beginning, so that’s a natural trait, right?

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, here’s another example. You guys probably know I like to doodle and when I was nine, I made my own card series, so I drew… I had three greeting cards and a postcard and we went and we picked out the ink and the paper and then when we got home, my dad was like, “Okay. Well, now you need to sell 10 packs before you can have dinner.” I was like, “Wait, what? I’m only nine.”

Teri Miller:

Oh my goodness, you’re great.

Kim Hanson:

I put them together in little sandwich baggies and I had to go and knock on the doors and try to sell my greeting cards and I learned that old ladies really like stationary and I would make them a deal because I needed to sell 10 so I could eat dinner, and so I’d be like, “Then there’s a deal, if you buy three, you get the same for two.” Or whatever it was.

Just things like that. My dad just always put me on the spot and even when I stepped in to be the CEO, I wasn’t sure if I was really ready, but I was willing and if you’re willing and you’re brave and you’re not afraid of risk and you’ll try, you might find out that you’re more capable of things than you knew.

Dr. Amy Moore:

I love that.

Teri Miller:

It’s so good because kids never know, we never know as humans. We never know what we’re capable of until we push to failure, until we push ourselves to try the uncomfortable otherwise, we just sit here peaceful and quiet and comfortable and we never do anything, so that’s so good.

Dr. Amy Moore:

This next one really speaks to me. Your parents taught you to FORGIVE EASILY. Walk us through that one.

Kim Hanson:

My parents, and I think one thing is my dad is really good at forgiving and forgetting and so not only… These things are things that he also modeled, it’s not just things that he said to me and I think that that’s an important point too, that if people demonstrate for you forgiveness, then it’s a lot easier for you to forgive. But we used to always have to say that we were sorry and then we’d have to hug each other.

When you’re a sibling and you’re just in a fight and now you have to hug each other it’s like ah, but I’ve also just learned that when you don’t forgive, you can become bitter and bitterness only hurts you, and so sometimes the other person doesn’t even know maybe that you haven’t forgiven them and so I’ve just learned to just always forgive easily.

In fact, back when I was a youth pastor’s wife, when my husband was a youth pastor, we went to a conference and there was a pastor’s wife there who talked about… Because when you’re a pastor’s wife, people will come up to you and they’ll just say anything. It’s amazing, and they think that they’re safe even talking about your family or your husband.

She had this great lesson that when someone comes up to her and says something mean about her husband or his sermon or whatever it is, that she would say in her head, I forgive you. I forgive you. I forgive you. I forgive you, as they’re talking and saying their stuff. That just really stood out to me and I’ve just always done that so if someone comes up and I start to feel a little offended, I just start forgiving them instantly.

Teri Miller:

Gosh, that inner talk, just say it to yourself.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Powerful.

Teri Miller:

That is so good because I’m thinking about when one of my kids or my husband or whatever’s annoying me, that I can just start going and inside I’m going, I forgive you. I forgive you. I forgive you. I forgive you and nod and okay, when I punch them in the face but no, if I start doing that, I’ll be a nicer person.

Kim Hanson:

No, I do, you want to punch them in the face, but I’ve just learned to forgive.

Teri Miller:

That’s so good. [crosstalk 00:16:18].

Kim Hanson:

Honestly if-

Teri Miller:

[inaudible 00:16:19] go ahead.

Kim Hanson:

Go ahead.

Teri Miller:

I said I want to tattoo that on my arm. Say it to yourself, forgive. I forgive you. I forgive you. Go ahead.

Kim Hanson:

I was going to say that it’s the hardest to forgive people that we love and are close to because they hurt us the most. It’s a lot easier just to forgive someone you don’t know, or a stranger you don’t know very well but man, if you can practice it and then forgive those that are really important to you, you know what I mean? That is important.

I learned a few years ago, you know how… I always used to think that love and hate were opposites, do you know what I mean? Love and hate. But someone showed me a diagram that hate is actually on a circle really close to love and that’s why hate can so easily come in to a relationship where there has been love and so, you know what I mean? If you learn how to forgive, then you never have to worry about getting bitter which leads to hate.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Because you have to have a powerful emotion to feel that way, and so you rarely have a powerful emotion about a stranger. Absolutely.

Teri Miller:

Well, hey, I want to hear about this next one. You said that your mom taught you, BE INTERESTING, NOT PERFECT.

Kim Hanson:

I love this lesson and I don’t know that I always understood it as a kid, sometimes I’d be working on a project or something that I’d make a mistake and I’d want to start over and my mom would just be like “No, you could just take that and turn that into a leaf.” Do you know what I mean? She was always good at, you know what I mean? Turning stuff into something different.

I really realized this a few, I don’t know, maybe sevenish years ago. I started making pottery and throwing pots and I wasn’t very good at it at first at all, and sometimes it would just fly off the wheel and hit the wall or whatever and I learned that I would take whatever, so now it’s flat on one side.

What I would do is I would just maybe cut that piece out and then add something to it and still make it into something and it’s interesting because people do find my pottery very interesting, it’s not perfect like lot of the ladies are trying to make everything perfect. I actually now will just go in and rough it up a little bit, make it look like it’s from the Italian countryside and people will be like, “Wow, I love how you came up with that handle idea.” But what they don’t know is I dropped it.

As women, I think one of the things we have to be careful, that we don’t teach our daughters how to be perfect and don’t expect them to be perfect because that’s a lot of pressure, and really when you think about it, we don’t really like perfect people. They’re too much to live up to, right?

Teri Miller:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kim Hanson:

If you’re interesting, then you’re fun to hang out with and you make a great friend. I’ve just learned that being interesting is a lot better than always trying to be perfect. The pressure then goes away and if you can just be fun and interesting, people will like you better than if you’re perfect.

Dr. Amy Moore:

I love that.

Teri Miller:

That’s so important for daughters. You’re right.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Well, sons too.

Teri Miller:

You’re right. Of course.

Dr. Amy Moore:

For all our kids.

Teri Miller:

For all our kids.

Kim Hanson:

Right?

Dr. Amy Moore:

Absolutely.

Teri Miller:

I see it. Kim, what you’re talking about, I see that more in my daughters probably because as a woman, it’s something I struggle with, that idea that I have to have it all together and do everything and please everybody and be perfect and I guess my daughters, I see emulate that more than my sons, so ouch.

Kim Hanson:

If you think of it-

Dr. Amy Moore:

[inaudible 00:20:44].

Kim Hanson:

Go ahead.

Dr. Amy Moore:

No, you go ahead.

Kim Hanson:

You can go on to the next one.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Okay. In addition to the lessons that you learned from your parents, you shared with us some lessons that you’ve learned from brain training, which is what you do and you’ve done your whole life, your professional job now. The first one was, GET RID OF NEGATIVE TALK, talk to us about that.

Kim Hanson:

At LearningRx, while someone’s in brain training, we teach them three life lessons and these are really the three things that stood out to me when I was a kid and I did brain training. The first thing is to get rid of negative talk. When things are hard, it’s real easy to get down on yourself and to have negative speak in your head, and way back in the, I don’t know, like ’80s, when I was in brain training, my dad had this Pringles can and on the Pringles can, he had cut out a bunch of magazine eyes and pasted them on it.

When you’re doing brain training, you’re only working on what you can’t do and so it’s hard, but it’s so good for you. I remember when I would say, “I can’t.” My dad would make me go and spit it out and drop it into the “I Can” because the can was eyes, “I Can”, and then I would have to shake it and go, “I can, I can, I can, I can.” All of a sudden you start to really curb your talking because I would hate to have to go over and put my I can’t into that eye can.

It’s funny, I did the same thing when my daughter, Lily was doing brain training with me, she’d be like, “I can’t.” I would be like [inaudible 00:22:45], I’d buzz her and then she would have to say, “I can, I can, I can, I can, I can.” Five times and so that’s just part of our process. As a brain trainer, we try to weed out any negative talk.

Dr. Amy Moore:

I like that and that’s an important life lesson for anything that you’re trying to accomplish.

Kim Hanson:

If you could just change that, what a great gift to give to someone.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Absolutely.

Teri Miller:

That eye can, I love that idea.

Dr. Amy Moore:

I do too.

Teri Miller:

It’s so great especially for little kids. I just get the best ideas. I’m just taking notes as you’re talking.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Teri’s going to go home and make an “I Can” can.

Teri Miller:

I do but every Thursday evening I go home and I have these great ideas and Friday, my kids are like, “What?” Friday I’m going to be like, “All right, we’re making it.” Eye can. I love it.

Kim Hanson:

The next lesson that we have in our brain training is that IT’S OKAY TO FAIL, BUT IT’S NOT OKAY TO QUIT, and this is the big idea that I think builds resilience and grit in the students that go through our program because we’re only working on what you can’t do. If you can do it, then there’s no reason to work on it because we’re building skill.

You have to practice and drill and repeat and repeat and repeat and repeat, but it’s such a good thing to learn. Albert or not Albert Einstein, but Thomas Edison, I grew up at and went to an elementary school that was named after Thomas Edison and I can remember on the wall they had, I have not failed, I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.

Teri Miller:

Nice.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Love it.

Kim Hanson:

I just think that that’s a great lesson.

Dr. Amy Moore:

We’ve been talking, we’ve had several guests on our podcasts in the last couple of episodes that have talked about perseverance and self-efficacy, and just learning through your mistakes and learning through your failures and using those as opportunities to grow and so I love that one of those lessons just aligned so beautifully with what we’ve been learning.

Teri Miller:

Isn’t this the third time that that has come up that theme, that idea?

Dr. Amy Moore:

Yes.

Teri Miller:

Obviously this is a recurring theme, that theme that we really need to absorb as moms to begin, how can we really take this and coach and train our kids that failure isn’t failure. It’s just a pathway to success.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Absolutely.

Kim Hanson:

You’re not always going to be good when you try something, but if you practice it, you will get better.

Dr. Amy Moore:

That takes us to the next lesson that you teach in brain training, ANYTHING WORTHWHILE TAKES HARD WORK. Talk to us about that.

Kim Hanson:

Most things that are really important are things that didn’t come easy. They are things that take hard work and so to learn as a kid how to put in that extra effort and to not shy away from hard work, but to step up to it and that even when you want to quit, to keep going and that’s something that happens a lot in our training.

You can see sometimes when your student is frustrated, but if you just tell them, you know what, I know you’re frustrated, let’s try it three more times and then we’ll move on to something else. It’s putting in that, okay, I want to stop, everything in me wants to stop but if I just do three more reps or if I do it three more times, then that hard work pays off.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Absolutely. Hey, so we need to take a quick break, hear a word from our sponsor, which is LearningRx.

Teri Miller:
Sponsor Ad from LearningRx

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Dr. Amy Moore:

We’re back talking to Kim Hanson, CEO of LearningRx about some important life lessons for parents and kids. You’ve shared with us lessons that your parents taught and you’ve shared with us lessons that you teach kids in brain training but you’ve also mentioned that you’ve taught your own kids a few lessons of your own and so the first one that you told us about was BE A GIVER, NOT A TAKER. Talk to us about that.

Kim Hanson:

This is an important one when you have a toddler because toddlers are all about mine, mine and you have to try to instill in them how to be a giver, not just always a taker. When you meet an adult who is a taker, not a giver, they’re not someone you want to spend a lot of time with and so I want my kids to be successful so just teaching them how to say sorry and thank you and please, even when they were babies, I taught them sign language for please, thank you.

I know that even when they were a little bit older, I could sometimes, if someone gave them something, I could be standing behind that person and I could sign to them and they’d be like, “Please.” or “Thank you.” Just teaching them that, teaching them how to pass out things instead of this is all mine, just how to share and how to be life-giving versus life-sucking. That your goal should be any time you enter a room or an event, that you leave it better than you found it because you left life there. That’s something that I’ve always… My daughter Lily, my youngest, she’s now 20, but I think you guys have met her. When she walks in a room, she just lights it up, she just-

Dr. Amy Moore:

Yeah she does.

Kim Hanson:

… sun shine, you know what I mean? She’ll come up to me and she’ll be like good morning my beautiful mother, you know what I mean? It’s just stuff… When you have a kid that talks to you like that, you’re like, how can you not smile? People just find her life-giving and all my kids, I think they do. But you want to teach that to your kids.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Absolutely.

Teri Miller:

I love that. It makes sense thinking about that she’s the youngest, that that’s something you were teaching your children very intentionally, be a giver, not a taker and I love that phrase you said, give life don’t suck life. Don’t suck life out of a room, bring life to a room. But it makes sense that your youngest, she received that lesson not just from you, but from her older siblings and that’s so cool to see that obviously as you’re describing, that that plays out, it trickles down in your family.

I think sometimes too, we don’t realize how much we have to give and if we start giving when we’re young, then we’ll be generous throughout our life. I’ve even spent time with Compassion International in the… We went to Africa and we were in some of the worst slums in the world, and when I was speaking with these kids just to share with them, they had nothing, but they had a smile to give, and they have wisdom, they can do something kind for someone.

We all have something to give and if we think about how we can be kind and how we can give, that that’s really important, on the flip side of that though too is how to be a good receiver, and I grew up in the Midwest, you pull your boots up and you know what I mean? You always carry everything and you open doors for yourself and that type of thing. I have twins and when I had my twins and you have to carry two car seats, it can be really heavy. I remember one day I was walking towards the church and I had two, a car seat in each one. It weighs probably like 25 pounds each, right?

Dr. Amy Moore:

Yeah.

Kim Hanson:

I’m thinking I can’t carry these babies anymore. God you need to send me help and then when I got up to the door, there was a friendly guy with a big smile and he opened the door and welcomed me and he’s like, “Do you want me to carry one of your babies?” My response though was, “No, I’m almost there now.”

Then I started to think about, wow, here I asked God for help, and God sent me the help and what did I do? I didn’t receive it. You have to be a good receiver and so that day I really learned, if someone offers me help, I’m going to just say, “Yeah, I would love some help.” Because otherwise I’m robbing them of a blessing.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Yes.

Teri Miller:

Good. That’s a really, really good balance from just remembering from what you talked about, even from the first life lessons which is more on that side of work smart, do things well, give it all your effort, which if you just stay on that side of the spectrum, you can tend to be in this perspective of I’m completely self-reliant. I can do all things on my own. I am successful unto myself. Then I love that you’re saying, “Well, no. You’ve got to have the other side too. You’ve got to have this beautiful balance of being a good receiver as well.” That’s really, really good for us to hear.

Dr. Amy Moore:

For sure. Then your last lesson is to BE FAITHFUL IN LITTLE THINGS EVERY DAY. What does that look like?

Kim Hanson:

There are so many little things that you can be faithful in and a lot of times we just think, “Well, will anybody even notice?” But things just like, have a clean room or make your bed, or be on time, look people in the eyes, just even respect elders. I remember when I was little and we had a lake home, my grandparents did, we called it the cottage and when adults would come, if we were sitting on the couch, we were supposed to get up and offer them our seat so just how to respect an elder or how to pick up your toys, how to be a good steward, just that personal responsibility and not to say things that you’ll regret later. I’ve taught my girls to keep all the “sassy” in their head and-

Teri Miller:

Great.

Kim Hanson:

If you can learn how to do that and just even BE A GOOD FRIEND to your siblings, because someday they’ll probably end up being some of your best friends. But it’s hard to do that when you’re teenagers and so when you are faithful in those little things every day, I think you’re trusted with more so, how do you get to be the CEO of a large company, be faithful in little things.

As you build that, one of the things I always do with my kids is we do a 10 Minute Tidy, so around 8:00 or 9:00 at night, we go and we put 10 minutes on the microwave counter, and then we all just pick up and tidy up the house and then when the alarm goes off, then we’re done. It’s cool because my son, when he lived in Australia with some roommates, I think he had some messy roommates and he established a 10 minute tidy there.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Nice.

Teri Miller:

Good.

Dr. Amy Moore:

It actually reminds me of this graduation speech that went viral a few years ago. I can’t remember who it was but he said, if you want to change the world, start by making your bed every day.

Teri Miller:

Nice.

Dr. Amy Moore:

Really because you’re just instilling really good habits in the small things, for sure.

Teri Miller:

I want all these, I want them all on a list. I may have to just type these up afterwards.

Dr. Amy Moore:

You don’t have to, we publish transcripts of everything.

Teri Miller:

I know, but I want it in a nice sheet of-

Dr. Amy Moore:

Like a big poster on the wall.

Teri Miller:

Right, that I can just then stick up in my kitchen because you know I’m going to be talking to my kids about this tomorrow, so that I could stick this up in my kitchen and it can be a reminder because I forget, I get all motivated and then two weeks from now, I’m going to forget, and I’m going to forget that I need to be encouraging my kids to be good receivers and to work smart and I’m going to forget about 10 minute tidy and you know what, let’s do it and let’s make that available as a little-

Dr. Amy Moore:

We’ll make it as a PDF for our listeners.

Teri Miller:

Yes, you got to do that. Got to do it.

Dr. Amy Moore:

That’s a great idea, Teri.

Teri Miller:

Kim, this is so good.

Kim Hanson:

Well, you know there are a lot of people out there that have taught me a lot of things because I am a learner, I’ve read a lot of books, listen to a lot of tapes and then if you think about just how to apply those things and just start with one thing, you can’t do it all. You can’t have everything, where would you put it?

Teri Miller:

Well, hey we’re almost at the time, but I want you to tell the listeners real quick about LearningRx specifically, tell us about LearningRx.

Kim Hanson:

LearningRx is a brain training company, and we can help really anyone who wants to do things better, faster and easier so if someone who’s struggling to learn to read or maybe they can’t remember what they’ve read, or maybe they have a hard time paying attention or they’re easily distracted or it just takes them too long to get things done, and they want to be faster, then brain training is something that can be very powerful in building skill and looking at those cognitive skills.

Also, we do have a book that my dad and I wrote together called Unlock the Einstein (Inside), and if that is something that you are interested in downloading, I have that available. If you could just go to our website, we have a new tab that says Brain Training Resources, and you can download that for free along with some brain training games even.

Teri Miller:

Nice.

Dr. Amy Moore:

You can download the whole book for free?

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, the whole book.

Dr. Amy Moore:

That’s awesome.

Kim Hanson:

The whole book for free. You can also-

Dr. Amy Moore:

How could-

Kim Hanson:

You can also call one of our centers or call our 866-BRAIN-O1, I think.

Teri Miller:

BRAIN-01, yeah.

Kim Hanson:

Set up a consultation or an assessment to go in and if you’re worried about one of your kids and want to see where they are when it comes to their cognitive skills, it’s something that can be done and we do it all the time every day and then the cool thing is we can not only assess them and pinpoint why they might be having a difficulty, but then we can tailor brain training that works on what they can’t do and turns it into a, I can do it.

Teri Miller:

Good.

Dr. Amy Moore:

For people who actually want to change lives for a living, you also have opportunities for them to open LearningRx centers around the country, right?

Kim Hanson:

Yeah, we have so many cities where there’s availability to start your own brain training center. If you’ve thought, “Man, I’ve always wanted to be my own boss and I’ve always wanted to have that flexibility and do something meaningful in my community.” We do have opportunities to open your own brain training center.

Dr. Amy Moore:

How would people find out about that?

Kim Hanson:

You can also go onto the learningrx.com and you can click on a tab called, Open a Center, and that will take you to a site that tells all about how to open your own brain training.

Dr. Amy Moore:

All right. Look, we are out of time and need to wrap up, but this has been a fantastic conversation today. I would just love to thank our guest Kim Hanson, the CEO of LearningRx ( & BrainRx). If you would like to learn more about LearningRx, like Kim said, you can go to learningrx.com where you can also download her book that she co-authored with her father, UNLOCK THE EINSTEIN INSIDE.

Thank you so much for listening today. If you liked our show, we would love it if you would leave us a rating or review. if you would rather watch us, you can subscribe on YouTube, and so please follow us on social media @TheBrainyMoms and on Instagram @thebrainymoms, @dr_amymoore and @terissaamiller. Look until next time, we’re busy moms and we know you’re busy moms, so we’re out.

 Teri Miller:

See ya!

Show Notes and Links:

Printable PDF of the 10 Tips for Raising Good Humans – Kim Hanson CEO of LearningRx

Connect with Kim Hanson

LinkedIn: Kim Hanson,CFE,BCCS | LinkedIn
Twitter: Kim Hanson (@kmgibhanson) / Twitter

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/learningrx
Find out more about LearningRx: www.learningrx.com and BrainRx: www.BrainRx.com

Download a free digital copy of Unlock the Einstein Inside: https://www.learningrx.com/blog/2018/august/free-download-of-the-book-unlock-the-einstein-in/

Download FREE brain training resources from LearningRx: https://www.learningrx.com/about-us/brain-training-resources/


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